Visual art sources

Reference list

Artist, Initial/s date of the work, Title of the work, description, dimensions (if available), held at Gallery name, Location.

Picasso, P 1937, Weeping woman, oil on canvas, 55.2 x 46.2 cm, held at The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Notes
  • Any description of a work follows the title in lower case.  It is separated from the title by a comma.
  • Use the phrase 'held at' before the Gallery or Museum name.
In text referencing Woman in a hat (Kirchner 1911) is an example of German expressionism in a time...

Reference list

Artist, Initial/s date of the work, Title of the work, description, dimensions (if available), exhibited at Title of the exhibition, Title of the gallery, Location, dates of the exhibition.

Kirchner, EL 1911, Woman in a hat, oil on canvas, 95 x 85cm, exhibited at The mad square: modernity in German art 1910-1937, The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 25 November 2011- 4 March 2012.

Notes
  • Always place the title of the work in italics not the title of the exhibition.
  • Use the phrase 'exhibited at' before the exhibition name.
  • Include the dates of the exhibition at the end of the citation.

In text referencing

"The exhibition features works by some of the era's..." (Australian Symbolism 2012)

Reference list

Curator, initial/s  date of the exhibition, Title of the exhibition, held at Gallery or Museum name, Location.

Australian Symbolism 2012, held at The Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

Notes
  • If no curator is mentioned use the title in italics where the author should be both in-text and in the reference list.
  • Place the phrase 'held at' before the Gallery or Museum name

Reference list

Author, Initial/s date, Title of the catalogue, Publisher, Place.

Holland, A 2010, Love, loss & intimacy, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Notes
  • If the catalogue has an author or editor the citation is the same as any book.
  • When there is no author or editor use the gallery or museum name instead e.g. National Gallery of Victoria 2010, Salvador Dalí: liquid desire, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

In text referencing

Portrait of a man (Memling c. 1470) is typical...

Reference list

Artist, Initial/s date of the work, Title of the work, description, Name of the database, <URL>.

Memling, H c.1470, Portrait of a man, oil on panel, ARTstor, <http://www.artstor.org>.

Notes
  • A lower case c. before the date means circa or the approximate date of the work.
  • There is no need to include a viewed date for works on a database. This is only required for  websites as they are not stable and likely to change over time.
In text referencing

Caravaggio's Entombment of Christ 1602-1603, was much admired at the time...(Graham-Dixon 2010, fig. 36).

Reference list

Author, Intital/s Date of the publication, Title of the book, Publisher, Place.

Graham-Dixon, A 2010, Caravaggio: a life sacred and profane, Allen Lane, London.

Notes
  • Use the page number in-text for the image if it is available
  • If the book has plates inserted between the numbered pages, use the plate number instead of the page number, e.g. (Seward 1998, pl. 3)
  • If each work included is given a number use that number, e.g. (Graham-Dixon 2010, fig. 24) or plural (Graham-Dixon 2010, figs 24-26)

In text referencing

The installation My bed (Emin 1998) expresses...

Reference list

Artist, Intial/s date of the work, Title of the work, description, Name of the organisation or website, viewed day month year, <URL>.

Emin, T 1998, My bed, mattress linens pillows, Saatchi Gallery, viewed 16 May 2012, <http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/artpages/tracey_emin_my_bed.htm>.

Notes
  • Include both the viewed date and the web address (URL) when citing an image from a website

In-text Referencing

Direct Quotes:

Always include the page number in-text when using a direct quote.  If the resource does not include page numbers, omit that part of the in-text reference.

Author Notes:

Include the surname/s of the author and year. For example,

 

No author: The life of insects (1979, p.23)  (The life of insects 1979, p. 23)

 

One author: Metcalf (2005, p. 184) (Metcalf 2005, p. 184)

 

Two to three authors: Savage, Bagnall and Longhurst (2005, p. 13)  (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p. 13)

 

Four or more authors: Kring et al. (2010, p. 71) (Kring et al. 2010, p. 72)

 

Group / corporate author: National Institute on Drug Abuse (2010)  (National Institute on Drug Abuse 2010)

Author Prominent

Metcalf (2005, p. 184) states that "the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any institutions of governance; no chiefs or councils of elders, no armies or law enforcement".

Kring et al. (2010, p. 71) observe that “during the Dark Ages, some people with mental illness were cared for in monasteries, but many simply roamed the countryside”.

Information Prominent

"the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any institutions of governance; no chiefs or council of elders, no armies or law enforcement" (Metcalf 2005, p. 184).

It has been suggested that “during the Dark Ages, some people with mental illness were cared for in monasteries, but many simply roamed the countryside” (Kring et al. 2010, p. 72).

"Most drugs of abuse directly or indirectly target the brain's reward system by flooding the circuit with dopamine" (National Institute on Drug Abuse 2010).

Paraphrasing:

It is strongly recommended that you also include the page number(s) when paraphrasing.

Author Prominent

Metcalf (2005, p. 184) contends that critical anthropology is characterised by reflexivity rather than negativism.

Savage, Bagnall and Longhurst (2005, p. 13) argue that the demise of local identities posited by some sociologist over the last two centuries, has not been borne out.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, dopamine is released in the brain when most drugs of abuse are used (2010).

Information Prominent

Effective teaching is based on several... (Killen 2009, p.10)

The demise of local identities posited by some sociologist over the last two centuries, has not been borne out (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p. 13).